Artist Profile: Aimie Williams

BY TORMAIGH VAN SLYKE Sure, now Aimie Williams resides in Morinville, AB, with her husband and two daughters, but she grew up 100 per cent Peace River-style. She worked at Boston Pizza, she used to clean… [more...]

Artist Profile: Aimie Williams Artist Profile: Aimie Williams

A Clandestine Affair

The winner of theVAULTmagazine's Flash Fiction Contest is... Nikki Love We would like to thank everyone for entering the contest. While we received many great entries, there can only be one winner.… [more...]

A Clandestine Affair A Clandestine Affair

Graffiti: Street Art or Public Nuisance

BY DREW ROGERS A teenager is running down an alley. He’s being chased by police. As the officer catches him, he opens the suspect’s backpack and dumps out can after can of spray paint. The crime?… [more...]

Graffiti: Street Art or Public Nuisance Graffiti: Street Art or Public Nuisance

Film Review: The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug

The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug Released: December 13, 2013 BY SETH O'MORROW I can’t admit to being a fan of the Lord of the Rings. Look, I’m sure that J.R.R. Tolkien was a wonderful guy. I… [more...]

Film Review: The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug Film Review: The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug

Game Review: Call Of Duty: Ghosts

Call of Duty: Ghosts Released: November 5, 2013 For: Xbox 360 BY SETH O’MORROW I did it. I bit the bullet. I bought Ghosts. It feels…kinda alright. The vomiting hasn’t started yet. That’s always… [more...]

Game Review: Call Of Duty: Ghosts Game Review: Call Of Duty: Ghosts

theVAULTmagazine to Suspend Production

Dearest Reader,

Since December 16, 2010, we have worked tirelessly to create what the Peace Region was missing—a cool magazine, filled with cool things, for free. Why? In short, growing up here we yearned for more. We went out, found more, achieved more and came back from our studies gleaming with idealism and enthusiasm. We thought hard and decided a cool magazine, filled with cool things, for free could change the Peace Region. And, it did. It has ushered in a new era for Northern Alberta and sparked hope in the minds and hearts of many. Cheesy? No, it’s nothing short of incredible.

We won’t deny it, in a lot of ways theVAULTmagazine has rewarded us handsomely. We have earned the respect of fine Peace Region business people and residents. Strangers have crossed the street to thank us and applaud us for our efforts. We won the Young Entrepreneur(s) of the Year award from the Peace River and District Chamber of Commerce in 2012. We’ve truly come leaps and bounds from Issue One. We’ve learned a lot and grown as people, publishers and business owners.

Conversely, the financial stress has proved too much for theVAULTmagazine to handle. The good news: because we have worked hard to become the best at what we do here in the Peace Region, we have acquired some great side projects, including Move Up magazine. These other ventures have proven fruitful and deserve a lot of attention and care. So, we’ve scaled our core staff back down to just us two and we have recently acquired some excellent downtown office space in Peace River.

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Letters to Ourselves before we started theVAULTmagazine

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Dear “Tormaigh December 17, 2010,” This is “Tormaigh December 18, 2013”

Hey, this is your future self and I really need you to focus on what I’m going to say. This letter could alter the course of your life and ultimately the course of history, but don’t worry I checked into it and no butterflies die or anything, so it’s totally cool for us to do this.

Alright, you just arrived in Peace River last night. During the drive you and Jenelle hatched a plan to start an alternative newspaper in Peace River. I know this because you know this.

First words of advice, find a different word. You think it’s cool, and it is cool, but many business owners and some readers here are turned off by the word alternative. You will spend your first year trying to get the word out there and the second year trying to re-position the brand, calling it the “edgy” newspaper instead, which is a poor substitute for “alternative.” I ended up just calling it cool. Maybe you’ll have a better idea. Get back to me on that one.

In the next couple days you will start referring to it as “a revolution.” People will say, “What are you doing back home?” And you will coyly reply, “I’m going to start a revolution, baby.” You’ll then go on to explain all the reasons how an Alternative Weekly will save our fair region from the boredom, apathy and isolation we’ve all experienced our whole lives. That was good. Do that again.

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Artist Profile: Aimie Williams

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BY TORMAIGH VAN SLYKE

Sure, now Aimie Williams resides in Morinville, AB, with her husband and two daughters, but she grew up 100 per cent Peace River-style. She worked at Boston Pizza, she used to clean McGrath School in the summer and she babysat pretty much every kid in Lower West Peace back in her day.

You know Williams artistically from nearly every advertisement that has appeared in theVAULTmagazine and Move Up magazine. In addition, she has done mega amounts of design work for theVAULT Publishing and Design, such as the Hell’s Belle calendars, the (upcoming) Pow Wow calendars and PeaceFest 2013.

Even before we snagged up her amazing talents Williams has worked on an impressive roster of big names, including the Edmonton Eskimos, Pepsi, Travel Alberta and the Edmonton Oilers, to name a few.

Before that, Williams attended Peace High in the mid ‘90s. Perhaps you remember her giant, floor-to-ceiling Nomads mural she painted on the gymnasium wall. Or, maybe you remember the painting of Adolf Hilter on the wall of Mr. Goruk’s social studies class. That was hers—Williams was commissioned to paint a communist leader for him. As a high school student, Williams also volunteered creating set designs for Peace Players’ The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe.

In years since, Williams has designed logos for the Peace Regional Outreach Campus (where she collaborated with students to brainstorm ideas), the Andrew Education Centre and North Country Fair’s T-shirts, posters, and bumper stickers.

With theVAULTmagazine going on hiatus, you may be wondering what visual contributions Williams might be making in our fair region. The answer is, possibly more than ever. During the indefinite hiatus, Plato’s Cave Publishing, which is the parent company to theVAULTmagazine, will transition into theVAULT Publishing and Design, which will allow Williams more availability to design for materials other than just magazines.

Naturally, we had the chance to talk to Williams about her craft, her journey, and her future plans.

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A Clandestine Affair

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The winner of theVAULTmagazine‘s Flash Fiction Contest is… Nikki Love

We would like to thank everyone for entering the contest. While we received many great entries, there can only be one winner. We felt this entry was well written, composed well, had excellent timing and character building considering the limited word count. We also liked the severity of the secret contained within the story you are about to read–it has an Outer Limits or Twilight Zone quality to it that we enjoyed very much. The story affects you. You don’t necessarily go about your day after reading this tale–a very admirable trait, again, with such a restricting word count. Without further ado, we present to the theVAULTmagazine‘s Flash Fiction Contest’s winning entry…

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Graffiti: Street Art or Public Nuisance

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BY DREW ROGERS

A teenager is running down an alley. He’s being chased by police. As the officer catches him, he opens the suspect’s backpack and dumps out can after can of spray paint.

The crime? Graffiti.

Artists come in all varieties. This tribe, who use manmade structures as their medium and endure a lot of scrutiny in most urban centres. On one end, graffiti can be incredible street art that turns urban sprawl into an ever-changing gallery, but it can also be a needless eyesore.

For instance, gangs have traditionally used graffiti “tags” as a way of marking territory. These tags are a simple name or symbol that is replicated by members as a way of showing their presence in areas. Additionally, petty vandalism does nothing to help the reputation of graffiti as a legitimate art form. Every time you see a nasty word hastily thrown up on a wall it doesn’t reflect well on graffiti artists.

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One a Day Keeps Nothing Away

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BY TONY NICKONCHUK

Vitamin use is ubiquitous in Canada. Approximately 50 per cent of women and 35 per cent of men take a daily vitamin or mineral supplement.  They are so commonly used that few question their necessity.

James Lind was an 18th century Scottish physician tasked with finding a cure for scurvy, a greater threat to the Royal Navy than enemy arms.  Instead of relying on anecdotes as his colleagues did, he conducted the first known clinical trial.  Citrus fruit was so obviously effective that the supply of lemon juice was made mandatory on all British ships.

It took 100 years to discover that vitamin C in citrus fruits is what cures scurvy, but Lind’s rational approach nonetheless identified the best treatment and saved lives.

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You’re not the writer you think you are

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BY MARY WARREN

Everyone can write. It’s what we learned to do in grade school. We write to our friends every day via online messaging, and text, and some of us even write stories as a pastime. This has afforded us a great sense of confidence in writing. After all, isn’t it easy?

The plight of the aspiring author tends to be a sense of arrogance and an inflated ego. I myself have been guilty of thinking I was better than I truly was from years of teachers telling me I was an excellent writer of fiction. There’s nothing wrong with the support teachers and family give us when we write something exceptional as a student, but it’s when we forget to take it at face value that we set ourselves up for disappointment.

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Film Review: The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug

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The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug
Released: December 13, 2013

BY SETH O’MORROW

I can’t admit to being a fan of the Lord of the Rings. Look, I’m sure that J.R.R. Tolkien was a wonderful guy. I just don’t think he’s that great of a writer. The dude can weave worlds, certainly. However, he does so in such a meandering fashion that I must compare him to Victor Hugo in terms of why I do not enjoy his work. He’s the kind of guy who depicts a scene by describing the bricks in a wall. How many bricks are there? What are they made of? Are they tropical sunset and murky stool? Who mixed that granite? I don’t care. What’s Frodo doing?

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Game Review: Call Of Duty: Ghosts

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Call of Duty: Ghosts
Released: November 5, 2013
For: Xbox 360

BY SETH O’MORROW

I did it. I bit the bullet. I bought Ghosts. It feels…kinda alright. The vomiting hasn’t started yet. That’s always a good thing. Of course, the lingering feeling that I’ve become something, no, someone else, is so permeating that I type this with paranoid anxiety.

I’m not a Call of Duty fan. I’ve illustrated this from my very first review for this magazine. The only one up until now that I’ve truly enjoyed (like, it was really good) was Black Ops 2, and even then, the annoying aspects of the series were still ever-present. How is Ghosts, you ask? I’ll tell you.

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Christmas with the California Raisins

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BY TERRY CAMERON

‘Tis the season for merriment and good cheer. What better way to celebrate than with a favorite old Christmas album. So I pulled out, Christmas with the California Raisins from 1988 knowing there would be some magic in those grooves. As soon as the needle slid into the first song, “Santa Claus is Coming to Town,” out jumped the Raisins. A.C. Beebop on drums, Stretch on bass, Red on guitar and piano and Carls Jr. adding sax.

With a hardy Ho-Ho-Ho it was Motown time but with four feet of snow (Snowtown).

I heard stirrings in the kitchen as the Raisins rollicked into “Jingle Bell Rock.” Snap, Crackle and Pop magically appeared in toques and gay apparel playing along on tambourine, claves and cowbell. The Raisins were inspired and bust into “Winter Wonderland” which brought out the Pop Tarts singing, “We can build a snowman and pretend he’s Parson Brown.” The kitchen continued coming alive with cereal characters and Christmas treats.

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